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The Brick collection of the Aquincum Museum includes all Roman period ceramic architectural elements unearthed during excavations in the territory of Budapest.

 

The Brick collection of the Aquincum Museum includes all Roman period ceramic architectural elements unearthed during excavations in the territory of Budapest. ”Ceramic architectural elements” refers to all objects made from terracotta which were originally manufactured for architectural purposes, such objects may include walling bricks, floor bricks, ceramic pipes, elements for wall- and floor heating and roof tiles. The collection contains stamped, inscribed, hand-marked and impressed goods as well asand pieces with no identifying marks on them at all. Criteria for their inclusion in the collection  include the general concept and the scientific purposes of excavators and research objectives. Objects which have research potentials are kept in separate brick reserves or in one of the small find collections of one of the museum’s archeological smallfind collection.

There has been research on Roman brick at Aquincum from the very beginning. In 1778, István Schönvisner, professor at the University of Pest identified Aquincum, based on stamped bricks found among the ruins of the Roman bath he unearthed in Old-Buda.

Specialization in Roman archeology on the basis of different classes of find groups started in the 1930s in Hungary. At the beginning of his career, János Szilágyi, published the first and still unique provincial brickstamp-collection. The work produced by Szilágyi, later the director of the Aquincum Museum, is still fundemental as he organized the brick-collection of Aquincum Museum as well. However, the present approach of Roman brick-research in Hungary is rather organized around archaeological factors connected to architecture, construction techniques, and industrial production. Zoltán Havas is the archeologist responsible for the collection. The material is available for research and study only with permission from the director-general of the Budapest History Museum.  

Zoltán Havas